If you’re considering having contemporary glass rooms added as a conservatory or extension at home and are wondering if you can get the job done and still adhere to your principles as a vegan when it comes to the construction,design and finishing touches, the good news is that yes, of course you can!

Vegan design includes all products, materials and fabrics that are cruelty-free and human, so not containing, exploiting or harming any conscious living being, whether that’s human or non-human, as well as covering products and so on that cause no harm to the planet.

No doubt you’re aware by now that there is growing consumer interest in leading a cruelty-free lifestyle, with this ideology really coming to the fore last year thanks to a push from some big-name supermarkets and restaurants all over the UK ensuring that vegans are properly catered for in terms of food.

But veganism isn’t just about what we eat – it covers all aspects of our lives. With regards to interior design, there are all sorts of options available to you these days so you don’t have to just go with the more traditional products that might have tempted you in the past.

For example, you could choose to invest in Organic Natural Paint, which sells wall, wood and emulsion paints that are all cruelty-free. We’re also intrigued by the work of Israeli designer Erez Nevi Pana, who recently held a Vegan Design exhibition proving it is indeed possible to come up with designs without using any materials derived from animals.

 

Speaking to Dezeen last year, he said: “It is not aesthetic or about function, it is a placid theory that can turn explosive. It is a trial leading a design discussion through the atrocious reality of animals concocted within our objects, and towards an alternative, ethical orientation of harmony and of oneness with all animate and inanimate forms.”

It might also be worth checking out the PETA Vegan Homeware Awards 2018, celebrating the brands, products and designers leading their fields. Anthropologie, for example, took home the award for the best vegan sofa, crafted with performance wool that, interestingly, isn’t wool at all but instead a hard-wearing and resistant vegan fabric that can last for years.

If you love the look of sheepskin but don’t like the idea of harming Dolly, what about decorating your home with Ikea’s Fardrup faux sheepskin rug instead? This way you can still enjoy the aesthetics of such a piece but safe in the knowledge that no animals have been harmed in the making of it.

As for help with interior design, check  out Suszi Saunders, who took the vegan home award away with her, praised for her rich textures, decadent details and dark colours, using only cruelty-free furniture and accessories.



If you’re considering having contemporary glass rooms added as a conservatory or extension at home and are wondering if you can get the job done and still adhere to your principles as a vegan when it comes to the construction,design and finishing touches, the good news is that yes, of course you can!

Vegan design includes all products, materials and fabrics that are cruelty-free and human, so not containing, exploiting or harming any conscious living being, whether that’s human or non-human, as well as covering products and so on that cause no harm to the planet.